Bradford, Yorkshire

Local Landmarks

gospel vision is so blessed to have some truly

Incredible Landmarks

all around in the local area

Salts Mill

Salt’s Mill in the West Yorkshire England village of Saltaire is named for the man who established the woollen mill located here in the mid 19th century. Sir Titus Salt was born and raised in Leeds, not far from the site of the mill.

When Salt’s Mill closed, a man named Jonathan Silver purchased it and immediately began renovating it. Today, the main building of the mill is home to an assortment of enterprises, including:

  • The 1853 Gallery
  • A wide variety of shops that sell things like art supplied, books, jewellery, antiques, outdoor clothing, and household items.
  • Cafes and restaurants.

Alhambra Theatre

The Alhambra Theatre, the jewel in Bradford’s crown, was the vision of Francis Laidler, a local impresario. Laidler had the idea and vision to build a brand new theatre in 1912 and it was two years later that his dream was realised.

The Alhambra Theatre was officially opened at 2pm on 18 March 1914. Five days later, it opened its doors to the general public on 23 March for a Variety show, which ran for a week.

The Alhambra Theatre is regarded as the North’s premier receiving venue and hosts the best in large scale entertainment from international dance to musicals, drama and Yorkshire’s biggest panto.

Museum of photography

The National Science and Media Museum, in the heart of Bradford, explores the science and culture of light and sound technologies and their impact on our lives. With the aim of inspiring the scientists and innovators of the future, it invites visitors to see more, hear more, think more and do more.

Its galleries and exhibition spaces help illuminate world-famous collections in photography, film and television. Explainers create learning activities that fuel the imagination and investigate the collections and exhibitions. Three cinema screens—including an IMAX theatre— showcase the magic of moving images from around the world in Bradford, the first UNESCO City of Film.

York

Imagine a city with Roman roots and a Viking past, where ancient walls surround contemporary independent shops and vibrant eateries and there’s a festival for every month of the year. Welcome to York – the Original City Adventure!

Perfectly placed half-way between London and Edinburgh and with the glorious Yorkshire Dales, North York Moors and Wolds right on the doorstep, York is unlike any other English city.

There’s thirty world-class museums you can explore, the best racecourse in the country and a thriving cultural scene, not forgetting, York is voted the best place to live in the UK by the Sunday Times.

So, what are you waiting for

haworth

Home of the famous Brontë sisters, Haworth is an undisputed literary mecca, attracting visitors from all around the world.

With its historic cobbled Main Street, iconic parsonage and rolling moors, the picturesque proportions of this Airedale village exude a vintage charm that makes you feel you’ve stepped into another era.

The Keighley Worth Valley steam railway also stops at Haworth on it’s journey between Keighley and Oxenhope, taking in the beautiful countryside. Excellent shops, restaurants and accommodation can also be found in and around the village and for those who like the outdoors there are endless opportunities to discover Bronte Country.

The village also has a varied events calendar, including the popular Victorian events in the run up to Christmas and the 1940’s weekend held in May.

Yorkshire dales

The Yorkshire Dales is home to outstanding scenery, great castles, abbeys and a breathtakingly peaceful atmosphere. At its heart are two very special protected areas – Yorkshire Dales National Park and Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) – as well as it having the Forest of Bowland AONB and North Pennines AONB as its close neighbours. These protected areas are truly not to be missed.

Each of the Yorkshire Dales has a different character. The Southern Dales are less remote, yet still wildly beautiful. The Northern Dales provide wild heather moorland and valleys full of hay meadows, dry stone walls and barns. And in the West, the pretty villages and small towns each have their own charm. The Dales are worth a visit at any time of year – whether it’s to visit a snug country pub with an open fire in the winter months, or stay in a rambling riverside cottage for a summer break. The possibilities are endless!

The location is perfect. It is halfway to everywhere